ADHD Parenting

"Your Shortest Path to a Respectful Child and a Peaceful Home…Period."

  • When your child is young your primary role is to set limits about what is and what is not acceptable behavior. Your teens still need this type of direction, but your method of delivery needs to change.

    It is quite okay to tell a child what to do and what not to do. However, most teens do not respond well to being ordered around. Teens have a natural desire to want to run their own lives. Therefore, when setting limits for your teens, just telling them will not be very effective. Instead, your focus should be on discussing and negotiating appropriate behavior. The more input you allow your teen to have in setting limits, the more likely he is to stay within them.


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    Here are 5 tips that will make setting limits for your teens more effective:

      1- Choose the right time and place. The right time means when both of you are calm. If either one of you is upset or angry, the discussion will not go as well. The right place means in privacy away from other children.
      2- Focus on what you want rather than what your child is doing wrong. The natural response to criticism is denial and rationalization. Neither of these promotes discussion. There are times when you will need to criticize your teen’s behavior, but you want to minimize this as much as possible.

      3- Let your child experience the natural consequences of his behavior. This is hard to do. We want to save our children from pain, especially when we see so clearly what is coming. However, your child needs to learn to use good judgment. The best way the learn good judgment is to experience bad judgment. So as long as nothing dangerous is going to happen, let your child learn from his mistakes.
      4- Come to an agreement about appropriate discipline. Children are more ready to keep to their limits and to accept the consequences when they violate those limits, if they have a say in establishing the rules.

      5- Follow through. Rules are not suggestions; they are rules. Rules need to be enforced. Your child needs to know you are serious.

    In order to follow through correctly, you need to use consequences effectively. However, most parents use consequences entirely wrong.

    Find out the #1 reason why most parents use fail when they give consequences.


    Go to:

    Getting Consequences to Work



    Warmly,

      Anthony Kane, MD
        P S Please leave a comment because I would really like to get your reaction to this.

          If you would like to have a quick step-by-step plan on how to end your child's difficult behavior forever and your child is between the ages of 2 and 11:

            Please go to:

          How to Improve Your Child's Behavior

          1 Comment
        • Here are three tips to get kids to do chores:

            1-Have a family meeting. Discuss how everyone lives in the home and everyone contributes to the mess. Therefore, everyone must contribute to cleaning and maintaining the home.

            2- Teach your child to figure out what needs to be done. If you notice there is a room that needs cleaning, rather than giving an order ask your child what problems he sees and what needs fixing.
            3- Show your child how you like things done. Try to work together. This teaches your child how to do it right and provides for some good together time.

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          Warmly,

            Anthony Kane, MD
              P S Please leave a comment because I would really like to get your reaction to this.

                If you would like to have a quick step-by-step plan on how to end your child's difficult behavior forever and your child is between the ages of 2 and 11:

                  Please go to:

                  How to Improve Your Child's Behavior

                  No Comments
                •